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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Perception and agreement in parent-child dyads found in the catalog.

Perception and agreement in parent-child dyads

Mary Eyre Stopes-Roe

Perception and agreement in parent-child dyads

attribution theory applied to family life.

by Mary Eyre Stopes-Roe

  • 10 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Birmingham, Dept of Psychology.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20008987M

Parent-child dyads were video recorded in a laboratory (TD group,) or at a clinical site (LI group,) while sharing a wordless picture book (WL condition) and an e-book (EB condition). ). It has been proposed that high levels of differing perceptions within parent-child dyads may reflect maladaptive interaction styles and could predict negative behavioral or psychological functioning (De Los Reyes, Goodman, Kliewer & Reid- Quinones, ).

Parent-Child Communication about Sex in African American Mother-Son Dyads Article (PDF Available) October with 3, Reads How we measure 'reads'.   Parent–child relationships are among the most important relationships for adolescents. Adolescence is a period of rapid biological, cognitive, and neurological changes 1, which have a salient impact on psychosocial functioning and relationships adolescence, parent–child relationships are thought to become more equal, interdependent, and reciprocal .

The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of informant discrepancies by evaluating levels of parent-child agreement and disagreement over who takes responsibility for SB medical tasks in relation to family conflict and medical adherence. Participants were preadolescents with SB. Data used in this study are taken from the first wave of data collection (when .   Shared parent–child experiences while engaged with an iPadTM were examined to determine if and then how parents interact with their children when using mobile digital devices. In total, parent–child dyads participated in an observation session where parent–child interactions using the touchscreen tablet device were video recorded in order to observe first .


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Perception and agreement in parent-child dyads by Mary Eyre Stopes-Roe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Results. There was no significant agreement between parent and child for the HUI2 or HUI3 whereas agreement between dyad and child was (95% confidence interval [CI]Perception and agreement in parent-child dyads book for the HUI2 and (95% CI) for the HUI3 by: The relatively high level of agreement for family support (70%) between parent-child dyads suggests that most pairs shared similar perceptions on the level of support offered to the child to increase physical activity and decrease TV by: In a qualitative study of transfer of diabetes management responsibilities and conflict in parent-child dyads over the adolescent period, Schilling et al.

() reported that parents of 8- to year-old children with diabetes took active steps to transfer responsibility for diabetes management to their children, with only moderate amounts of Cited by: Background: This study addressed differences between parent–child dyads with excessive body mass (overweight or obesity) and dyads with normal body mass in obesity determinants, derived from social-ecological models.

It was hypothesized that parents and their 5–11 years-old children with excessive body mass would (1) report lower availability of healthy food at home, (2) Author: Karolina Zarychta, Anna Banik, Ewa Kulis, Monika Boberska, Theda Radtke, Carina K. Chan, Karolina. This study examined perceptions of stigmatization in a sample of 85 pediatric burn survivors and their parents.

Survivors and a parent independently completed the Perceived Stigmatization Questionnaire (PSQ) rating the frequency that the child experienced three types of stigmatizing behaviors: absence of friendly behavior, confused and staring behavior, and Cited by:   This study examined the agreement between parent and child perceptions of parenting behaviors, the relationship of the behaviors with the child's weight status, and the ability of the parent to correctly identify weight status in parent–child dyads (89 Caucasian and 87 African American).

Correlational and regression analyses were used. Also, including parent–child dyads as participants provided the perspective of both the parent and child. There are several limitations. First, the relatively small sample size, limited age group of 8–12 year olds, and qualitative methods do not allow for generalization.

Two hundred eighty-three parent–child dyads (children: % female, age: M = years, SD = ) filled out questionnaires on children’s physical activity, perceptions of parental support, and self-efficacy. The agreement between child and parent reports were quantified using the intra-class correlation coefficient.

This book offers state-of-the-art solutions to this age-old problem by presenting methodological and data-analytic approaches useful in investigating processes that take place among dyads: couples, coworkers, or parent-child, teacher-student, or doctor-patient pairs, to name just a few.

Parent and child joint book reading (JBR) characteristics and parent facilitative language techniques (FLTs) were investigated in two groups of parents and their young children; children with normal hearing (NH; n = 60) and children with hearing loss (HL; n = 45).

Parent–child dyads were videotaped during JBR interactions, and parent and child behaviors were coded for. Parent-child dyads were categorized into one of four groups based on concordance of injustice perceptions: (1) concordant high, (2) concordant low, (3) discordant high parent (P) – low child (C), and (4) discordant low P – high C.

Parent injustice perceptions were significantly higher than child perceptions (t()=, p. Percent of parent-child dyads in which responses about child's behaviors agree. Both parents and children were asked what they thought of the child's weight (underweight, about right, or overweight).

Parents and children agreed in 81% of the dyads (κ = ). [Show full abstract] involved dyads comprised of fathers, mothers, and children who completed the Revised Parent-Child Interaction Questionnaire measuring the parent-child relationship quality.

We drew on a large cohort of parent-child dyads of 9- and year-old children to first document parent-child agreement of child's sexual orientation and then to preliminarily establish the association between this agreement, or lack thereof, and several psychiatric disorders commonly elevated among sexual minorities starting in childhood.

An average agreement score was calculated for parent–child dyads that answered at least 10 out of 14 practices ( out of ; 99%). We calculated percentage agreement between child and parent report for each parental practice in total and for each of. For example, in a study of US parent–child dyads, parents’ use of dialogic reading techniques (e.g., prompts, questions, pointing) and children’s story comprehension skills were lower with digital books than with electronic console books and CD‐ROM books that had fewer special effects (Parish‐Morris, Mahajan, Hirsh‐Pasek, Golinkoff.

In order to clarify the degree of accordance between the self‐reports of children and the proxy reports of their parents on the former's HRQOL, parent–child dyads, as grouped by their depressive status, were assessed by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL).

The Kappa coefficients, ranging from tofall into the degree of poor or fair agreement between respondents (Landis & Koch, ), which led to the next analysis, t-statistics, to explore parent–adolescent discrepancies in their perceptions of parental support.

Dyadic developmental psychotherapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment method for families that have children with symptoms of emotional disorders, including complex trauma and disorders of attachment.

It was originally developed by Daniel Hughes as an intervention for children whose emotional distress resulted from earlier separation from familiar caregivers. Comparisons were made between parent-child dyads reporting low (parent-child dyads (%) exceeded the 2-h SV threshold on both weekdays and weekend days; 5 parent-child dyads (%) did not exceed this threshold.

Agreement was observed in terms of a positive communication (Kappa = ) between % (57/91) of the child/caregiver dyads school bullying. Conclusions: Disagreement was observed between children and their caregivers in relation to the frequency and communication of .Background: While it is known that most parents are deeply invested in their child’s health, it is unknown what factors related to the parent-child dyad might be associated with successful smoking cessation.Two hundred eighty-three parent–child dyads (children% female, age:M= years, SD = ) filled out questionnaires on children’s physical activity, perceptions of parental support.